Strength Training for the Intermediate Everyday Athlete

Josh Kennedy and James Breese chat about how they approach strength training for intermediate athletes compared to beginners. They touch on how to determine your fitness level before starting a particular program and why it’s important for everyday athletes to train based on their fitness level to avoid injury.

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Discussion Points:

  • Release of the new book
  • Prerequisites to be considered an intermediate
  • What beginners should work on vs What intermediates should work on
  • Strength development pyramid
  • Strength training – the human battery
  • Strength endurance
  • Layering System
  • Tempo time and attention rules
  • 7 Human movements
  • Framework for intermediate strength training
  • When to do skill work
  • Keep it simple
  • Importance of controlling rep tempo

Quotes:

 

“…skill practice, the heavier reps. We want to do that at the start because we don’t want to fatigue too early.” – James Breese

 

“High skill, high fatigue exercise and we don’t want to be fatigued doing them towards the end, cause, that’s where you can potentially increase the risk of injury.” – James Breese

 

“Strength endurance work comes first, then muscular endurance work comes afterwards” – James Breese

 

“If you don’t know what tempo they’re doing, you’ve got no idea whether they’ve improved or not.” – Josh Kennedy

 

Resources:

Maximum Aerobic power Book

 

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